Depressed skull fracture secondary to the Mayfield three-pin skull clamp
Salami Mohcine, El Mostarchid Brahim
The Pan African Medical Journal. ;20:262. doi:10.11604/pamj..20.262.6492

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Depressed skull fracture secondary to the Mayfield three-pin skull clamp

Salami Mohcine, El Mostarchid Brahim
Pan Afr Med J. 2015; 20:262. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.20.262.6492. Published 19 Mar 2015



The use of increasingly precise, intelligent neurosurgery instruments that allow intraoperative accuracy, visualization, surgical access, has led to mastery of surgical techniques and the transformation of prognosis, the Mayfield three-pin skull clamp was designed to rigidly affix a patient's head to the operating table during craniotomy drilling and delicate microneurosurgery. However, these instruments are not without risk, since several types of complications have been described. We report the case of depressed skull fracture a secondary to the Mayfield three-pin skull clamp in a patient operated for a meningioma of the posterior fossa as shown in this picture CT.


Corresponding author:
Salami Mohcine, Department of Neurosurgery, Military Hospital of Instruction Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco
mohcinesalami2010@gmail.com

©Salami Mohcine et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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