Binary logistic regression analysis of the association between body mass index and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a teaching-case study
Yousef Khader
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2019;33 (Supp 1):16. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2019.33.1.18686


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Binary logistic regression analysis of the association between body mass index and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a teaching-case study

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2019;33 (Supp 1):16. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2019.33.1.18686

Received: 16/03/2019 - Accepted: 08/05/2019 - Published: 16/05/2019

Key words: Independent t-test, chi-square test, logistics regression, glycemic control

© Yousef Khader et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/series/33/1/16/full

Corresponding author: Yousef Khader, Department of Public Health, Jordan University of Science and Technology, The Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET), Jordan (yskhader@just.edu.jo)

This article is published as part of the supplement “Case Studies for Public Health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region” sponsored by The Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET)

Guest editors: Pr Yousef S Khader (yskhader@just.edu.jo) - Department of Community Medicine, Public Health and Family Medicine Faculty of Medicine,Jordan University of Science & Technology, Jordan


Binary logistic regression analysis of the association between body mass index and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a teaching-case study

Yousef Khader1,&

 

1Department of Public Health, Jordan University of Science and Technology, The Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET), Jordan

 

 

&Corresponding author
Yousef Khader, Department of Public Health, Jordan University of Science and Technology, The Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET), Jordan

 

 

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an increasing global health problem in both developed and developing countries, including Arab countries. The goal of T2DM management is to delay the onset of complications associated with the disease and impede disease progression; this is achieved mainly through glycemic control. Unfortunately, glycemic control remains poor, ranging between 40% and 60% worldwide. This case study demonstrates the practical application of basic and advanced statistical techniques to analyze the association between independent and dependent variables. This case study is designed for the training of basic level field epidemiology trainees or any other health care workers working in public health-related fields. It can be administered in 5-7 hours in class or as a take-home exercise.

 

 

How to use this case study    Down

General instructions: this case study should be used as adjunct training material for novice epidemiology trainees to reinforce the concepts taught in prior lectures. The case study is ideally taught by a facilitator in groups of about 20 participants. It can be administered as a take-home assignment or part of an examination assignment. This assignment require analysis and writing from the student.

 

Audience: this case study was developed for novice field epidemiology students. These participants are commonly health care workers working in the county departments of health whose background may be as medical doctors, nurses who work in public health-related fields. Most have a health science or medical statistics background is preferred.

 

Prerequisites: before using this case study, participants should have received lectures on survival analysis.

 

Materials needed: Flash drive, flip charts, markers, computers, SPSS software

 

Time required: 5-7 hours

 

Language: English

 

 

Case study material Up    Down

  • Download the case study student guide
  • Request the case study facilitator guide

 

 

Competing interest Up    Down

The authors declare no competing interests.

 

 

Acknowledgement Up    Down

Authors would like to acknowledge The Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET) for their technical support.

 

 

Annexe Up    Down

Annex 1: SPSS logistic regression

 

 

References Up    Down

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