Measles outbreak investigation in Southwest Ethiopia, February 2017
Desta Hiko Gemeda, Hussein Muhammed Gena, Herbert Brian Kazoora, Haley McLeod
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;30 (Supp 1):13. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2018.30.1.15280

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Supplement article

Case study

Measles outbreak investigation in Southwest Ethiopia, February 2017

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;30 (Supp 1):13. doi:10.11604/pamj.supp.2018.30.1.15280

Received: 22/02/2018 - Accepted: 13/04/2018 - Published: 18/05/2018

Key words: Measles, outbreak investigation, Ethiopia

© Desta Hiko Gemeda et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/series/30/1/13/full

Corresponding author: Desta Hiko Gemeda, Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia (destahiko@gmail.com)

This article is published as part of the supplement “African Case Studies for Public Health Volume 2” sponsored by African Field Epidemiology Network, (Case Study Design and Development, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

Guest editors: Scott JN McNabb, Ghada N Farhat, Casey Daniel Hall, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong, Richard Dicker


Measles outbreak investigation in Southwest Ethiopia, February 2017

Desta Hiko Gemeda1,&, Hussein Mohammed Gena2, Herbert Brian Kazoora3, Haley McLeod4

 

1Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia, 2Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia, 3African Field Epidemiology Network, Kampala, Uganda, 4Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta

 

 

&Corresponding author
Desta Hiko Gemeda, Faculty of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia

 

 

Abstract

Effective response to complex disease outbreaks requires health workers to be equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills. This case study, based on an actual measles outbreak that occurred in Ethiopia in January 2017, was developed to enhance participantsí knowledge and skills on disease outbreak investigation and response using epidemiological study designs. This case study is prepared for health care workers with an advanced level of training in public health. This case study should be completed in a classroom setting and takes approximately 3 hours to complete.

 

 

How to use this case study    Down

General instructions: for this case study, two facilitators are needed for a class of 20 participants. It is recommended that participants work in teams. Facilitators should randomly select participants to read the narratives and questions. Divide participants into 4 or 5 groups to discuss questions. Then randomly select one participant from a group to summarize what they have discussed or come to the front of the classroom to write calculations on the whiteboard. When one group answers a question, move on to the next group to hear their input as well. When one person gives an answer, confirm it with participants in other groups. The facilitator should give a chance to all of the participants to participate, encourage dialogue between groups, and allow trainees to learn from each other.

Audience: national and sub-national surveillance officers, Field Epidemiology trainees and Master of Public Health graduates.

Prerequisites: for this case study, participants should have knowledge in the following areas: epidemiological study designs; Principles of outbreak investigation and response; Advanced data analysis; Sampling procedures in epidemiologic research.

Materials needed: laptop computer with Microsoft office, flip chart or white board.

Level of training: advanced level training in Public Health.

Time required: approximately 3 hours

Language: English

 

 

Case study material Up    Down

  • Download the case study student guide;
  • Request the case study facilitator guide.

 

 

Competing interests Up    Down

The authors declare no competing interests.

 

 

Acknowledgments Up    Down

We would like to extend our thanks to the African Field Epidemiology Network, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University,the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health, and Martha Getahun, a Field Epidemiology graduate.

 

 

References Up    Down

  1. Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute, Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. Guideline on measles surveillance and outbreak management. Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute. January 2012; 3rd edition. Google Scholar

  2. Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute Public Health Emergency Management Centre. Public Health Emergency Management. Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. 2012. Google Scholar

  3. Marta G, Tsegaye T, Eshetu A. Measles outbreak investigation and response, Southwest Ethiopia. Jimma University: Jimma (un published report). 2017.

  4. Jennifer Peat, Belinda Barton. Medical statistics: a guide to data analysis and critical appraisal. BMJ Books. 2005; 1st ed. Google Scholar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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