Abscessed inguinal metastasis as an initial presentation of testicular cancer
Carlos Eduardo Salazar-Mejía, Enrique González-Nava
The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;31:83. doi:10.11604/pamj.2018.31.83.17049

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Abscessed inguinal metastasis as an initial presentation of testicular cancer

Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;31:83. doi:10.11604/pamj.2018.31.83.17049

Received: 07/09/2018 - Accepted: 24/09/2018 - Published: 04/10/2018

Key words: Testicular cancer, young men, inguinal metastasis, abscessed

© Carlos Eduardo Salazar-Mejía et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/31/83/full

Corresponding author: Carlos Eduardo Salazar-Mejía, Centro Universitario Contra el Cáncer, University Hospital “Dr. José Eleuterio González” and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, México (carlos.salazarmj@uanl.edu.mx)


Abscessed inguinal metastasis as an initial presentation of testicular cancer

Carlos Eduardo Salazar-Mejía1,&, Enrique González-Nava1

 

1Centro Universitario Contra el Cáncer, University Hospital “Dr. José Eleuterio González” and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, México

 

 

&Corresponding author
Carlos Eduardo Salazar-Mejía, Centro Universitario Contra el Cáncer, University Hospital “Dr. José Eleuterio González” and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, México

 

 

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A 24-year-old man presented to the emergency service with fever, malaise and a large abscessed tumor located in the left inguinal region.He had a history of hydrocele and varicocele treated surgically in childhood.One year before admission, a small nodule approximately 1 x 2 cm appeared in his left inguinal region; this nodule increased in size and was accompanied by a weight loss of approximately 15 kg. On arrival, a large abscessed and ulcered adenopathy 20 x 18 x 11 cm with purulent secretion was seen in the area associated with a 5 cm left testicular tumor. Imaging studies revealed a 1 cm left subpleural lung nodule on short axis. A radical left orchiectomy and a biopsy of the abscessed adenopathy were performed and the histopathologic report showed a mixed germ cell tumor. Tumor markers after orchiectomy were LDH 1124 IU/L, β-hCG 197mIU/mL, AFP 172 ng/mL. Wide spectrum antibiotics were started in addition to wide surgical debridement of the abscess with a favorable clincial response. After surveillance, the patient was discharged to receive ambulatory chemotherapy. Inguinal ganglionic metastasis associated with testicle cancer is a rare finding.The history of inguinal and/or scrotal surgery could explain this phenomenon as a result of an alteration of regional lymphatic drainage.When this group of patients develops testicular cancer, involvement of an inguinal node is described in up to 2-10% of cases.Despite this, routine inguinal lymphadenectomy is still controversial in this scenario.

Figure 1: a large abscessed and ulcered adenopathy 20 x 18 x 11 cm in the left inguinal region

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Keywords

Testicular cancer
Young men
Inguinal metastasis
Abscessed

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